October Lights

Some great looking Aurora for Michigan Tuesday night following a Coronal Mass Ejection from the Sun on Sunday. It finally made its way to Earth’s magnetic field! And boy was it a strong impact.

Full Tilt

Arrived to a spot just in time to catch the opening act!

I first learned about the ejection from Tamitha Skov on twitter. She posts plenty of great space weather updates, and also the science behind the sun and its Earth effects. Upon hearing that Lights in North America were possible via the NWS Space Weather Prediction Center’s Facebook Page, I thought I would at least probe the skies of Michigan later.

Around midnight things started to ramp up on the Kp Index, a rough indicator of aurora visibility. Its dark, and parking along side a rural road is a little dangerous due to unsuspecting travelers, so I decided to start small and bike across the street to an apartment complex that opened to a large field. I’m still south of some intense light pollution, so was not expecting much, but just wanted a hint.

Kp ranges. The higher the Kp number, the further south aurora may be visible. On this October night, we reached about 6.5/7 on the Kp scale.

My tripod was missing in action, so this complicated things greatly. Taking photos of the aurora requires the camera to be very steady while the picture, sometimes 8-20 seconds in length, is being taken. So I just relied on setting the camera on the ground and placing some items under the lens to prop it a bit. Turns out on my first shot I got what I was looking for. The hint. Circled is just a slight green band of aurora popping up between two patches of loud light pollution. So lets trouble shoot; northern lights = check, tripod work around = check, no light pollution = no check.

Just a taste of aurora!

Just a taste of aurora!

Having to get up at 7am the next morning was also a negative factor, if these lights took off, I could be up for awhile.

Dew was forming on my car windows, a quick roll down of the windows and a wiper swipe and things were clear. I traveled to McDonald Park along Pickard Rd. which is west of town, and north of any obstructive light pollution.

When I got out of the car, I saw the tell-tale signs of an ongoing Northern Lights performance. What you see with your eyes is different than what the camera picks up. Aurora could look different in high latitudes then what I saw last night, but if I could describe it, it looked like an elevated fog. You could tell it was there because the sky above looked similar to sky right along the horizon, but in between… was the Lights. I modified a photo from early on to represent what I could see myself.

Estimation of what was visible to eyes early on.

Estimation of what was visible to eyes early on.

The camera tells a more colorful and stunning story. By having the shutter open and the camera taking a picture for 20 or so seconds, any lights in the dark sky are more pronounced. So stars are plainly visible, as well as the aurora colors. This was a few minutes after the above photo:

Lights by Man and Nature

Getting a little creative with the show still on. Timed a car going by to add a different type of light.

The sky lit up with activity right as I settled down. I mean I could actually see some vertical elements moving across the horizon to my naked eye. I teared up a bit. This was amazing. You see countless photos of the Northern Lights online(guilty here), but seeing it in the flesh, is just spine tingling. Red is apparently more rare as it is Oxygen reacting with the disturbance, and this take a little longer to process, may explain the abundance of green, but little sprites of red.

Dugout Lights

Nearby baseball field provided some foreground interest. This dugout seemed to be nicely enveloped in some lights.

If you’re interested in Aurora spotting, there are a few resources to keep an eye on. Things may get confusing along the way, but stick to sources that blend public viewing and educational. You’ll learn a lot fast!

Be patient, and be ready to be disappointed. Computer models and predictions can point to an event, but the light strength just may not cooperate. At the same time, the opposite can happen, and you may get a treat! Happy hunting!

About these ads

About gweatherc
Live in Michigan and enjoy observing the weather. Want to pursue it as a career! Currently taking classes at Central Michigan University.

3 Responses to October Lights

  1. Peyrefitte Jr, Ashton G says:

    And you didn’t call me? Some very nice pictures. I’ve seen the phenomenon only once—in New Hampshire—as green, shimmering curtains. Students would call, but by the time I got outside, the show was over. On occasion while taking observations on the roof, I used to see a whitish glow in the northern horizon there which I assumed might be the Northern Lights’ reflection from the Eastern Hemisphere. In Michigan, a student saw red curtains, but overall, it seems more students in New Hampshire have seen the Lights than in Michigan.

  2. Christine says:

    ISN’T IT AMAZING?? I saw them on my back deck years ago in Chelsea. I sat out there for hours! the most incredible show, Greg, and I’m happy you got to see this one…the colors you photographer are so cool.

    • gweatherc says:

      Thanks! Yes it truly is an amazing sight. I’m glad folks down here have witnessed them. I still wonder what it would be like to see them at higher latitudes near full strength! Better bring a coat!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: